The Homeland of Colombian Coffee Antioquia is where the production of Colombian coffee really began on a major scale. The region’s tropical climate and high-growing altitudes, of 1,400 to 1,950 meters ASL, made this an ideal region for growing fine coffees. Early farmers recognized the potential of the region, and braved the steep slopes of the Western and Central cordilleras to create the vibrant coffee-growing communities that still exist today. Coffee from Southwest Antioquia is clean and balanced, with a velvety body. Download Fact Sheet
Medellín, the second largest city in Colombia, was named one of the most innovative cities in the world in part due to its incredible public transportation program. Over 500,000 residents use its train system each day, and an outdoor escalator the height of a 28-story building whisks residents up steep hillsides.
Crossroads of the Cordilleras Southwest Antioquia's steep slopes and alpine peaks are contrasted with valley floors that almost reach sea level. The unique terrain is created by the Cordillera Central and the Cordillera Occidental, which cross through the region. The region has a colorful culture and history tied to its topography—it’s the homeland of intrepid mule drivers and chapoleras (women pickers) who were crucial for expansion into the steep slopes.
Agricultural Abundance Farmers in Southwest Antioquia have an average of about 4 hectares of coffee trees each, but they grow other crops as well. You can find plantains, yucca, beans, and corn alongside their coffee trees. These other crops generate additional income for farmers during periods when coffee isn’t being produced.
Hand Harvested on Rocky Slopes Southwest Antioquia is known for classic images of mule drivers and chapoleras because the steep mountain slopes must be navigated carefully, and ripe cherries have to be harvested by hand. These skilled workers meticulously harvest and sort ripe cherries, then pulp and ferment them. The fermentation process takes about 12 hours (which varies depending on temperature and relative humidity). After fermenting, parchment is washed and beans are slowly dried on patios, parabolic raised beds or in mechanical silos.

Headline lorum ipsum

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam scelerisque euismod diam, sed fringilla elit. Aenean quis volutpat justo. Sed ex erat.

Headline lorum ipsum

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam scelerisque euismod diam, sed fringilla elit. Aenean quis volutpat justo. Sed ex erat.

Headline lorum ipsum

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam scelerisque euismod diam, sed fringilla elit. Aenean quis volutpat justo. Sed ex erat.

Headline lorum ipsum

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam scelerisque euismod diam, sed fringilla elit. Aenean quis volutpat justo. Sed ex erat.
Antioquia Is Synonymous with Coffee.
Because of the quality of the soils and dedication of the people, coffee has been a major driver of development in this region, and locals are deeply committed to coffee production. Inhabitants of Antioquia—commonly called “Paisanos” —are well known for their traditions, commitment, and the entrepreneurial way they manage their farms.
Diversity of Cultures
The Southwest of Antioquia is home to many different cultures and inhabitants: Spanish descendants, Afrocolombians, and indigenous communities from Embera-Chami and Embera-Katio families. Native communities live in reservations, keeping their language, costumes, and own rules. In a region with such diversity, it is common to see different practices at farm level. That’s why we work to identify specific needs of both individual growers, and their communities, and work to help support them.
Café El Paisano Antioquia Coffee HARVESTING SEPT-DEC 2016 This is a cup with character; a well-balanced coffee with the sweetness of red fruits, crispy acidity and velvety body.
  • Flavor Red wine sweetness, ripe fruits
  • Body Balanced velvety body
  • Acidity Crispy and medium acidity
  • 1 - Fragrance/Aroma
  • 2 - Flavor
  • 3 - Acidity
  • 4 - Balance
  • 5 - Body
  • 6 - Aftertaste
  • 7 - Overall
  • Cupping Score: 84+
  • Quality: Colombia Excelso Antioquia, European Preparation
  • Producer: Carefully selected farms from the Antioquia community
  • Variety: Castillo/Colombia (67.05%) Caturra (32.95%)
  • Processing: Fully washed, dried using raised parabolic beds, patios or mechanical devices
  • Altitude: 1,700 to 2,200 meters ASL
  • Harvest: Main crop from September to December, fly crop from March to June
  • Packing: 65lb box  What’s this?
Continue your exploration of Colombia: Santander Nariño